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About 90% of the positions offered on Way Up are paid, and the startup sees 10,000 new college-age users signing up weekly.Listings on the website include freelancing gigs, bartending jobs, and campus representative roles for companies.

This was the earliest iteration of what would become their company, Today, Alfred is a startup that hires employees — Alfred Client Managers, or just "Alfreds" — to run weekly errands: things like buying your groceries, sorting your mail, dropping off packages, and taking care of your laundry for you.

You pay $99 a month for the service, plus the cost of things like your groceries.

Our ranking prioritizes entrepreneurs over investors, simply because it's a lot harder to start a company than to fund one. Let us know in the comments — we love telling stories about amazing people. In A-Z order » The complete list 1-100 » Read more about our No.

1 pick here » Managing directors, Insight Venture Partners Since it was founded in 1995, venture-capital firm Insight Venture Partners has raised more than $13 billion and invested in companies like Udemy, Zenefits, Docker, Nextdoor, and Hootsuite.

Residents at its first space, a 19-room apartment building in Brooklyn scheduled to open this fall, will pay for rooms on a month-to-month basis.

Common manages all aspects of living — from the application process to cleaning services to community events — to create the best experience for residents while also integrating with the neighborhood.

Way Up was born out of a campus-rep company that former Googler Liz Wessel had started with a fellow student at Penn; it's an alternative to a college career-service center and Symplicity, a job board employers have to pay for postings on.

It recently went Reham Ragiri is one of the only minority female founders to take a company through prestigious startup incubator Y Combinator, transforming the preowned-furniture marketplace in New York City.

To fight the proposed cap, Uber then aggressively marketed itself as a service for minorities and outer-borough residents (two groups taxis are notoriously bad at serving) and as a means for New Yorkers to find gainful employment.

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