Radiometric dating parent to daughter ratios

Accurate radiometric dating generally requires that the parent has a long enough half-life that it will be present in significant amounts at the time of measurement (except as described below under "Dating with short-lived extinct radionuclides"), the half-life of the parent is accurately known, and enough of the daughter product is produced to be accurately measured and distinguished from the initial amount of the daughter present in the material.

The procedures used to isolate and analyze the parent and daughter nuclides must be precise and accurate.

The Geologic Time Scale was originally laid out using relative dating principles.

The geological time scale is based on the the geological rock record, which includes erosion, mountain building and other geological events.

This normally involves isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

The precision of a dating method depends in part on the half-life of the radioactive isotope involved.

principle sources: Australian Museum https://au/the-geological-time-scale Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiometric_dating Carleton University numerical (or "absolute") age is a specific number of years, like 150 million years ago.

A relative age simply states whether one rock formation is older or younger than another formation.

He noted that different formations contained different fossils and he could map one formation from another by the differences in the fossils.

As he mapped across southern England, he drew up a stratigraphic succession of rocks although they appeared in different places at different levels.

By matching similar fossils in different regions throughout the world, correlations were built up over many years.

Only when radioactive isotopes were developed in the early 1900s did stratigraphic correlations become less important as igneous and metamorphic rocks could be dated for the first time.

For example, decay of the parent isotope Rb-87 (Rubidium) produces a stable daughter isotope, Sr-87 (Strontium), while releasing a beta particle (an electron from the nucleus).

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