Retroraleighs com dating html

They continued to be built in Nottingham until the mid-1970's, when the glamour of the 10-speed fad pushed them out of favor with the rising baby boom generation.

When a modern company sets out to build a bicycle, what they really build is the frame (if that.) They buy sets of tubing from a tubing company, cut and weld them together into a frame, paint it and install parts which they buy different specialized parts companies.

hub (c1903-1990s), it should have on the hub a date of manufacture, which would normally also be the cycle's date of manufacture. "6" for "1936." After that, they started using two-digit date stamps.

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A Raleigh bicycle of this era would have a Raleigh frame, made of Raleigh Tubing conected with Raleigh lugs, with a Raleigh bottom bracket, Raleigh cranks, Raleigh pedals, Raleigh headset, Raleigh handlebars, Raleigh stem, Raleigh seatpost, Raleigh hubs (Sturmey-Archer was a Raleigh subsidiary) and even Raleigh spokes.

All of these parts would have been made in the same factory.

In general, the quality reached its peak in the 1950s, and quality started to go down around the early 1960's, as management kept searching for ways to make the bicycles cheaper.

This table is focussed on the mainline Raleigh/Rudge/Humber "Sports" model.

Raleigh, in its glory years (up into the 1960's) was the absolute opposite.

In their enormous Nottingham factory covered 40 acres and employed nearly 7000 workers.

The saddles would be from Brooks, another Raleigh division, and the rims and tyres would be from Dunlop, a company closely related to Raleigh.

This level of integration has never been surpassed in the bicycle industry, though Schwinn came close in the same era.

The tables below are being compiled by examining bicycles that come in for service, and appear to be in original condition.

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