What is needed to do radiometric dating

Most are determined experimentally by institutions such as CERN with the Large Hadron Collider.

Decays are very random, but for different elements are observed to conform to statistically averaged different lifetimes.

If you had an ensemble of identical particles, the probability of finding a given one of them still as they were - with no decay - after some time is given by the mathematical expression This governs what is known as the "decay rate." The rate is unique to different particles and so to different atomic elements.

The phenomenon we know as heat is simply the jiggling around of atoms and their components, so in principle a high enough temperature could cause the components of the core to break out.

However, the temperature required to do this is in in the millions of degrees, so this cannot be achieved by any natural process that we know about.

In the case of carbon dating, it is not the initial quantity that is important, but the initial ratio of C, but the same principle otherwise applies.

Recognizing this problem, scientists try to focus on rocks that do not contain the decay product originally.

Because radiometric dating fails to satisfy standards of testability and falsifiability, claims based on radiometric dating may fail to qualify under the Daubert standard for court-admissible scientific evidence.

It is more accurate for shorter time periods (e.g., hundreds of years) during which control variables are less likely to change.

Any incoming negative charge would be deflected by the electron shell and any positive charge that penetrated the electron shells would be deflected by the positive charge of the nucleus itself. "Decay" simply refers to a meson or baryon becoming another type of particle, as the number of a certain type of particle goes down or decays as they are converted.

This can happen due to one of three forces or "interactions": strong, electromagnetic, and weak, in order of decreasing strength.

This interpretation unfortunately fails to consider observed energetic interactions, including that of the strong force, which is stronger the electromagnetic force.

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